Beware of Amazon Prime Day scams

Beware of Amazon Prime Day scams

SO HAVE THE SCAMS. CYBERSECURITY EXPERTS DON’T THINK THERE WILL BE FISHING ATTACKS CONNECTED TO AMAZON PRIME DAYS. THEY KNOW IT’S ALREADY HAPPENING. WE KNOW THAT WE’RE TRACKING THE THREAT ACTORS. WE’RE SEEING THE DOMAINS THAT ARE BEING STOOD UP. WE’VE SEEN THE TREND OVER TIME THOSE DOMAIN NAMES OR WEBSITES MAY LOOK SIMILAR OR MAYBE SPELLED NEARLY THE SAME AS AMAZON DIDN’T THE REPORTS OF FISHING SPIKE TREMENDOUSLY AROUND LAST YEAR’S AMAZON PRIME DAY. YEAH, THERE WERE ABOUT 3,700 MALICIOUS WEBSITES OR URL. OR SPUN UP AROUND AMAZON PRIME DAY LAST YEAR, AND WE’RE EXPECTING SIMILAR NUMBERS THIS YEAR TO PROTECT YOURSELF. DO NOT TRUST ANY EMAILS OR TEXT THAT APPEAR TO BE COMING FROM AMAZON, ESPECIALLY IF THEY CONTAIN LINKS INSTEAD GO DIRECTLY TO THE AMAZON WEBSITE AND CHECK YOUR ACCOUNT MESSAGES. GO TO THAT WEBSITE. IT’S TRUSTED AND UTILIZES SERVICES RIGHT THERE. TRUST. ME AND AMAZON IS PRESENTING A DEAL IT WILL BE AVAILABLE DIRECTLY ON T

Watch out for Amazon Prime Day scams

Amazon Prime Day begins Tuesday. Some deals have already started and so have the scams.Cybersecurity experts say phishing attacks connected to Amazon Prime Day are already happening. “We know that we’re tracking the threat actors. We’re seeing the domains that are being stood up. We’ve seen the trend over time,” said Joel Hollenbeck, with Checkpoint Technologies.Those domain names or websites may look similar or may be spelled nearly the same as Amazon.Phishing reports spiked around last year’s Amazon Prime Day.”There were about 3,700 malicious websites or URLs that were spun up around Amazon Prime Day last year, and we’re expecting similar numbers this year,” Hollenbeck said.To protect yourself, don’t trust any emails or texts that appear to be from Amazon, especially if they contain links. Instead, go directly to the Amazon website and check your account messages.”Go to that website – it’s trusted – and utilize the services right there. Trust me, if Amazon is presenting a deal, it will be available directly on the website. Don’t click on the links you get on an email,” Hollenbeck said.More than 148 million Americans have an Amazon Prime account.If you don’t have an Amazon account and get one of these emails or text messages claiming to be from the company, you’ll know right away that it’s scam.

Amazon Prime Day begins Tuesday. Some deals have already started and so have the scams.

Cybersecurity experts say phishing attacks connected to Amazon Prime Day are already happening.

“We know that we’re tracking the threat actors. We’re seeing the domains that are being stood up. We’ve seen the trend over time,” said Joel Hollenbeck, with Checkpoint Technologies.

Those domain names or websites may look similar or may be spelled nearly the same as Amazon.

Phishing reports spiked around last year’s Amazon Prime Day.

“There were about 3,700 malicious websites or URLs that were spun up around Amazon Prime Day last year, and we’re expecting similar numbers this year,” Hollenbeck said.

To protect yourself, don’t trust any emails or texts that appear to be from Amazon, especially if they contain links. Instead, go directly to the Amazon website and check your account messages.

“Go to that website – it’s trusted – and utilize the services right there. Trust me, if Amazon is presenting a deal, it will be available directly on the website. Don’t click on the links you get on an email,” Hollenbeck said.

More than 148 million Americans have an Amazon Prime account.

If you don’t have an Amazon account and get one of these emails or text messages claiming to be from the company, you’ll know right away that it’s scam.

#Beware #Amazon #Prime #Day #scams

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